What is Public Service Loan Forgiveness? And How Do I Qualify to Get It?

This piece was originally published at The Conversation.

The first group of borrowers who tried to get Public Service Loan Forgiveness – a George W. Bush-era program meant to provide relief to those who went into socially valuable but poorly paid public service jobs, such as teachers and social workers – mostly ran into a brick wall.

Of the 28,000 public servants who applied for Public Service Loan Forgiveness earlier this year, only 96 were approved. Many were denied in large part due to government contractors being less than helpful when it came to telling borrowers about Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Some of these borrowers will end up getting part of their loans forgiven, but will have to make more payments than they expected.

With Democrats having regained control of the U.S. House of Representatives in the November 2018 midterm elections, the Department of Education will likely face greater pressure for providing better information to borrowers, as it was told to do recently by the Government Accountability Office.

The Public Service Loan Forgiveness program forgives loans for students who made 10 years of loan payments while they worked in public service jobs. Without this loan forgiveness plan, many of these borrowers would have been paying off their student loans for 20 to 25 years.

Borrowers must follow a complex set of rules in order to be eligible for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program. As a professor who studies federal financial aid policies, I explain these rules below so that up to 1 million borrowers who have expressed interest in the program can have a better shot at receiving forgiveness.

What counts as public service?

In general, working for a government agency – such as teaching in a public school or a nonprofit organization that is not partisan in nature – counts as public service for the purposes of the program. For some types of jobs, this means that borrowers need to choose their employers carefully. Teaching at a for-profit school, even if the job is similar to teaching at a public school, would not qualify someone for Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Borrowers must also work at least 30 hours per week in order to qualify.

What types of loans and payment plans qualify?

Only Federal Direct Loans automatically qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Borrowers with other types of federal loans must consolidate their loans into a Direct Consolidation Loan before any payments count toward Public Service Loan Forgiveness. The failure to consolidate is perhaps the most common reason why borrowers who applied for forgiveness have been rejected, although Congress did provide US$350 million to help some borrowers who were in an ineligible loan program qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

In order to receive Public Service Loan Forgiveness, borrowers must also be enrolled in an income-driven repayment plan, which ties payments to a percentage of a borrower’s income. The default repayment option is not income-driven and consists of 10 years of fixed monthly payments, but these fixed payments are much higher than income-driven payments. The bottom line is it’s not enough to just make 10 years of payments. You have to make those payments through an income-driven repayment plan to get Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

Parent PLUS Loans and Direct Consolidation Loans have fewer repayment plan options than Direct Loans made to students, so borrowers must enroll in an approved income-driven repayment plan for that type of loan. Borrowers must make 120 months of payments, which do not need to be consecutive, while enrolled in the correct payment plan to receive forgiveness.

How can borrowers track their progress?

First of all, keep every piece of information possible regarding your student loan. Pay stubs, correspondence with student loan servicers and contact information for prior employers can all help support a borrower’s case for qualifying for Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Unfortunately, borrowers have had a hard time getting accurate information from loan servicers and the Department of Education about how to qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

The U.S. Government Accountability Office told the Department of Education earlier this year to improve its communication with servicers and borrowers, so this process should – at least in theory – get better going forward.

Borrowers should also fill out the Department of Education’s Employment Certification Form each year, as the Department of Education will respond with information on the number of payments made that will qualify toward Public Service Loan Forgiveness. This form should also be filed with the Department of Education each time a borrower starts a new job to make sure that position also qualifies for loan forgiveness.

Can new borrowers still access Public Service Loan Forgiveness?

Yes. Although congressional Republicans proposed eliminating Public Service Loan Forgiveness for new borrowers, the changes have not been approved by Congress. Current borrowers would not be affected under any of the current policy proposals. However, it would be a good idea for borrowers to fill out an Employment Certification Form as soon as possible just in case Congress changes its mind.

Are there other affordable payment options available?

Yes. The federal government offers a number of income-driven repayment options that limit monthly payments to between 10 and 20 percent of “discretionary income.” The federal government determines “discretionary income” as anything you earn that is above 150 percent of the poverty line, which would translate to an annual salary of about $18,000 for a single adult. So if you earn $25,000 a year, your monthly payments would be limited to somewhere between $700 and $1400 per year, or about $58 and $116 per month.

These plans are not as generous as Public Service Loan Forgiveness because payments must be made for between 20 and 25 years – instead of 10 years under Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Also, any forgiven balance under income-driven repayment options is subject to income taxes, whereas balances forgiven through Public Service Loan Forgiveness are not taxed.The Conversation

Some Good News on Student Loan Repayment Rates

The U.S. Department of Education released updates to its massive College Scorecard dataset earlier this week, including new data on student debt burdens and student loan repayment rates. In this blog post, I look at trends in repayment rates (defined as whether a student repaid at least $1 in principal) at one, three, five, and seven years after entering repayment. I present data for colleges with unique six-digit Federal Student Aid OPEID numbers (to eliminate duplicate results), weighting the final estimates to reflect the total number of borrowers entering repayment.[1]

The table below shows the trends in the 1-year, 3-year, 5-year, and 7-year repayment rates for each cohort of students with available data.

Repayment cohort 1-year rate (pct) 3-year rate (pct) 5-year rate (pct) 7-year rate (pct)
2006-07 63.2 65.1 66.7 68.4
2007-08 55.7 57.4 59.5 62.2
2008-09 49.7 51.7 55.3 59.5
2009-10 45.7 48.2 52.6 57.4
2010-11 41.4 45.4 51.3 N/A
2011-12 39.8 44.4 50.6 N/A
2012-13 39.0 45.0 N/A N/A
2013-14 40.0 46.1 N/A N/A

One piece of good news is that 1-year and 3-year repayment rates ticked up slightly for the most recent cohort of students who entered repayment in 2013 or 2014. The 1-year repayment rate of 40.0% is the highest rate since the 2010-11 cohort and the 3-year rate of 46.1% is the highest since the 2009-10 cohort. Another piece of good news is that the gain between the 5-year and 7-year repayment rates for the most recent cohort with data (2009-10) is the largest among the four cohorts with data.

Across all sectors of higher education, repayment rates increased as a student got farther into the repayment period. The charts below show differences by sector for the cohort entering repayment in 2009 or 2010 (the most recent cohort to be tracked over seven years), and it is worth noting that for-profit students see somewhat smaller increases in repayment rates than other sectors.

But even somewhat better repayment rates still indicate significant issues with student loan repayment. Only half of borrowers have repaid any principal within five years of entering repayment, which is a concern for students and taxpayers alike. Data from a Freedom of Information Act request by Ben Miller of the Center for American Progress highlight that student loan default rates continue to increase beyond the three-year accountability window currently used by the federal government, and other students are muddling through deferment and forbearance while outstanding debt continues to increase.

Other students are relying on income-driven repayment and Public Service Loan Forgiveness to remain current on their payments. This presents a long-term risk to taxpayers as at least a portion of balances will be written off over the next several decades. It would be helpful for the Department of Education to add data to the College Scorecard on the percentage of students by college enrolled in income-driven repayment rates so it is possible to separate students who may not be repaying principal due to income-driven plans from those who are placing their credit at risk by falling behind on payments.

[1] Some of the numbers for prior cohorts slightly differ from what I presented last year due to a change in how I merged datasets (starting with the most recent year of the Scorecard instead of the oldest year, as the latter method excluded some colleges that merged). However, this did not affect the general trends presented in last year’s post. Thanks to Andrea Fuller at the Wall Street Journal for helping me catch that bug.

Comments on the Proposed Borrower Defense to Repayment Regulations

The U.S. Department of Education is currently accepting public comments (through August 30) on their proposed borrower defense to repayment regulations, which affect students’ ability to get loans forgiven in the case of closed schools or colleges that misrepresented important facts. Since these regulations also affect colleges and taxpayers, I weighed in to provide a researcher’s perspective. My comments are reprinted below.

August 21, 2018

Jean-Didier Gaina

U.S. Department of Education

400 Maryland Avenue SW, Mail Stop 294-20

Washington, DC 20202

Re: Comments on the proposed borrower defense to repayment regulations

Dear Jean-Didier,

My name is Robert Kelchen and I am an assistant professor of higher education at Seton Hall University.[1] As a researcher who studies financial aid, accountability policies, and higher education finance, I have been closely following the Department of Education (ED)’s 2017-18 negotiated rulemaking efforts regarding borrower defense to repayment and financial responsibility scores. Since there were no academic researchers included in the negotiated rulemaking committee (something that should be reconsidered in the future!), I write to offer my comments on certain segments of the proposed regulations.

My first comment is on the question of whether ED should accept so-called affirmative claims from borrowers who are not yet in default and seek to make a claim against a college instead of only accepting defensive claims from borrowers who have already defaulted. For colleges that are still open, this is a clear decision in my view: affirmative claims should be allowed because ED can then attempt to recoup the money from the college instead of effectively requiring the taxpayer to subsidize at least some amount of loan forgiveness. However, the decision is somewhat more complicated in the case of a closed school, where taxpayers are more likely to foot the bill. My sense is that affirmative claims should probably still be allowed given the relationship between defaulting on student loans and adverse outcomes such as reduced credit scores.[2]

To protect taxpayers and students alike, more needs to be done to strengthen federal requirements for colleges that are at risk of closure. If a college closes suddenly, students may be eligible to receive closed school discharges at taxpayer expense. Yet my research and analyses show that ED’s current rules for determining a college’s financial health (the financial responsibility score) are only weakly related with what they seek to measure. For example, several private nonprofit colleges that closed in 2016 had passing financial responsibility scores in 2014-15, while many colleges have continued to operate with failing scores for years.[3] I also found that colleges did not change their revenue or expenditure patterns in any meaningful way after receiving a failing financial responsibility score, suggesting that colleges are not taking the current measure seriously.[4]

I am heartened to see that ED is continuing to work on updating the financial responsibility score metric to better reflect a college’s real-time risk of closing through another negotiated rulemaking session. However, I am concerned that students and taxpayers could suffer from continuing with the status quo during a potential six-year phase-in period, so anything to shorten the period would be beneficial. I again urge ED to include at least one academic researcher on the negotiated rulemaking panel to complement institutional officials and accountants, as the research community studies how colleges respond to potential policy changes that the rest of the committee may be proposed.

Finally, I am concerned about ED’s vague promise to encourage colleges to offer teach-out plans instead of suddenly closing, as the regulations provide no incentives for colleges on the brink of financial collapse to work with accreditors and states to develop a teach-out plan. It would be far better for ED to require colleges to be proactive and develop teach-out plans at the first sign of financial difficulties, reducing the risk to taxpayers by minimizing the risk of closed school discharges. These plans can then be approved by an accreditor and/or state agency as a part of the regular review process. Colleges would likely contend that having to develop a pre-emptive teach-out plan may affect their ability to recruit and retain students, but tying this to an existing benchmark of federal concern (such as a low financial responsibility score or being on HCM2) should alleviate that issue.

Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments on these proposed regulations and I am happy to respond to any questions that ED staffers may have.

[1] All opinions reflected in this commentary are solely my own and do not represent the views of my employer.

[2] Blagg, K. (2018). Underwater on student debt: Understanding consumer credit and student loan default. Washington, DC: Urban Institute.

[3] Kelchen, R. (2017, March 8). Do financial responsibility scores predict college closures? https://robertkelchen.com/2017/03/08/do-financial-responsibility-scores-predict-college-closures/.

[4] Kelchen, R. (forthcoming). Do financial responsibility scores affect institutional behaviors? Journal of Education Finance.

A Look at Federal Student Loan Borrowing by Field of Study

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Federal Student Aid has slowly been releasing interesting new data on federal student loans over the last few years. In previous posts, I have highlighted data on the types of borrowers who use income-driven repayment plans and average federal student loan balances by state. But one section of Federal Student Aid’s website that gets less attention than the student loan portfolio page (where I pulled data from for the previous posts) is the Title IV program volume reports page. For years, this page—which is updated quarterly with current data—has been a useful source of how many students at each college receive federal grants and loans.

While pulling the latest data on Pell Grant and student loan volumes by college last week, I noticed three new spreadsheets on the page that contained interesting statistics from the 2015-16 academic year. One spreadsheet shows grant and loan disbursements by age group, while a second spreadsheet shows the same information by state. But in this blog post, I look at a third spreadsheet of student loan disbursements by students’ fields of study. The original spreadsheet contained data on the number of recipients and the amount of loans disbursed, and I added a third column of per-student annual average loans by dividing the two columns. This revised spreadsheet can be downloaded here.

Of the 1,310 distinct fields of study included in the spreadsheet, 14 of them included more than $1 billion of student loans in 2015-16 and made up over $36 billion of the $94 billion in disbursed loans. Business majors made up 600,000 of the 9.1 million borrowers, taking out $6.1 billion in loans, with nursing majors having the second most borrowers and loans. The majors with the third and fourth largest loan disbursements were law and medicine, fields that tend to be almost exclusively graduate students and can thus borrow up to the full cost of attendance without the need for Parent PLUS loans. As a result, both of these fields took out more loans than general studies majors in spite of being far fewer in numbers. On the other end (not shown here), the ten students majoring in hematology technology/technician drew out a combined $28,477 in loans, just ahead of the 14 students in explosive ordinance/bomb disposal programs who hopefully are not blowing up over incurring a total of $61,069 in debt.

Turning next to programs where per-student annual borrowing is the highest, the top ten list is completely dominated by health sciences programs (the first two-digit CIP not from health sciences is international business, trade, and tax law at #16). It is pretty remarkable that dentists take on $71,451 of student loans each year while advanced general dentists (all 51 of them!) borrow even more than that. Given that dental school is four years long and that interest accumulates during school, an average debt burden of private dental school graduates of $341,190 seems quite reasonable. Toss in income-driven repayment during additional training and it makes sense that at least one of the 101 people with $1 million in federal student loan debt is an orthodontist. On the low end of average debt, the 164 bartending majors ran up an average tab of $2,963 in student loans in 2015-16 while the 144 personal awareness and self-improvement majors are well into their 12-step plan to repay their average of $4,361 in loans.

Trends in Net Prices by Family Income

I continue my look through newly-released data from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study by turning to trends in the net price of attendance by family income. The net price, which is the full cost of attendance (tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, and miscellaneous living expenses) less all grant aid received, is a key college affordability measure as it represents how much money students and their families have to come up with each year to attend college. This net price can be covered by a combination of savings, work income, and student loans, but it is worth noting that student loan limits for many undergraduate students are far below the net price. This means that many families face challenges in paying for college if the net price is a large share of their income.

The first figure here shows trends (since 2004) in the percentage of family income needed to cover the net price. In 2015-16, 48% of students faced net prices of less than 25% of their family income, 20% were between 26% and 50%, 9% were between 51% and 99%, and 23% of students had net prices greater than their family incomes. The good news is that the distribution of net prices held almost constant since 2011-12 after having taken a jump during the Great Recession.

In the second figure, I break down the percentage of students with net prices higher than their family income by type of college attended. Nearly half of students attending for-profit college were in this category, which is not surprising given the high prices charged by many for-profit colleges and students’ low household incomes. About one in five students attending public and private nonprofit four-year colleges are also in this category. Meanwhile, even 18% of community college students had net prices higher than their family’s income, which is a particular concern as quite a few colleges do not allow their students to take out federal loans.

What Explains Racial Gaps in Large Graduate Student Debt Burdens?

In my previous blog post, I used brand-new data from the 2015-16 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS) to look at trends in debt burdens among graduate students. The data point that quickly got the most attention was the growth in the percentage of African-American graduate students with at least $100,000 in debt between their undergraduate and graduate programs, with 30% of black students having six-figure debt burdens in 2015-16 compared to just 12% of white borrowers. This means that roughly 150,000 black borrowers had $100,000 in debt, more than half of the number of white borrowers with the same debt level (250,000) despite white graduate student enrollment being four times as white as black grad student enrollment.

My next step is to examine whether the black-white borrowing gap could be explained by other demographic and educational factors. I ran two logistic regressions with the outcome of interest being $100,000 or more in total educational debt using PowerStats, with the results presented in odds ratios. (To interpret odds ratios, note that they are percent changes from 1. So a coefficient of 0.5 means that something is 50% less likely to happen and 1.5 means that something is 50% more likely to happen.) The first regression below only controls for race/ethnicity.

Table 1: Partial regression predicting likelihood of $100,000 or more in debt among graduate students.
  Coefficient (Odds Ratio)    
Characteristic 95% CI p-value
Race/ethnicity (reference: white)
  Black or African American 2.50 (1.91, 3.26) 0.000
  Hispanic or Latino 1.12 (0.89, 1.41) 0.347
  Asian 0.62 (0.46, 0.83) 0.002
  American Indian or Alaska Native 1.31 (0.49, 3.50) 0.595
  Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 1.35 (0.38, 4.74) 0.640
  More than one race 1.73 (1.08, 2.77) 0.023
Source: National Postsecondary Student Aid Study 2015-16.    

 

This shows that black students were 150% more likely to have six-figure debt than white students (p<.001), while Asian students were 38% less likely (p<0.01). Hispanic students had a slightly higher point estimate, but it was not statistically significant.

I then controlled for a number of factors that could be associated with high graduate student debt amounts, including other demographic characteristics (gender, age, and marital status), level of study (master’s or doctoral), institution type, and field of study. The regression results are shown below.

Table 2: Full regression predicting likelihood of $100,000 or more in debt among graduate students.
  Coefficient (Odds Ratio)    
Characteristic 95% CI p-value
Race/ethnicity (reference: white)
  Black or African American 2.30 (1.79, 2.97) 0.000
  Hispanic or Latino 1.03 (0.80, 1.33) 0.828
  Asian 0.69 (0.48, 0.98) 0.036
  American Indian or Alaska Native 0.97 (0.25, 3.77) 0.964
  Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander 1.61 (0.44, 5.84) 0.468
  More than one race 1.82 (1.12, 2.95) 0.015
Female 1.00 (0.84, 1.19) 0.990
Age as of 12/31/2015 1.04 (1.03, 1.04) 0.000
Marital status (reference: single)
  Married 0.68 (0.55, 0.85) 0.001
  Separated 0.94 (0.51, 1.73) 0.840
Graduate institution (reference: public)
  Private nonprofit 1.64 (1.36, 1.98) 0.000
  For-profit 2.15 (1.64, 2.82) 0.000
Graduate degree program (reference: master’s)
  Research doctorate 3.00 (2.38, 3.78) 0.000
  Professional doctorate 7.07 (5.61, 8.90) 0.000
Field of study (reference: education)
  Humanities 0.99 (0.66, 1.48) 0.943
  Social/behavioral sciences 1.85 (1.38, 2.48) 0.000
  Life sciences 1.71 (1.14, 2.56) 0.009
  Math/Engineering/Computer science 0.34 (0.20, 0.57) 0.000
  Business/management 0.91 (0.64, 1.28) 0.577
  Health 1.93 (1.47, 2.53) 0.000
  Law 1.38 (0.90, 2.11) 0.140
  Others 1.26 (0.89, 1.79) 0.186
Source: National Postsecondary Student Aid Study 2015-16.    

 

Notably, the coefficient for being African-American (relative to white) decreased slightly in the regression with additional control variables. Black students were 130% more likely to have six-figure debt burdens than white students, down from 150% in the previous regression. Not surprisingly, doctoral students, students at private nonprofit and for-profit colleges, and students studying health, life sciences, and social/behavioral sciences were more likely to have $100,000 in debt than public university students, master’s students, and those studying education. Meanwhile, STEM students were far less likely to have $100,000 in debt than education students, which is not surprising given the large number of assistantships available in STEM fields.

This regression strongly suggests that the black/white gap in large student debt burdens cannot be explained by other demographic characteristics or individuals’ fields of study. Financial resources (such as the large wealth gap between black and white families) are likely to blame, but this is not well-measured in the NPSAS. The best proxy is a student’s expected family contribution (EFC), which only measures a student’s own resources as an adult student. Including EFC as a variable in the model brings the black/white gap down to 120% (not shown here for the sake of brevity), but a good measure of wealth likely shrinks the gap by a much larger amount.

Examining Trends in Graduate Student Debt by Race and Ethnicity

For many of us in the higher education world, the release of the newest wave of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS) is something akin to a national holiday. The NPSAS is a nationally-representative dataset of both undergraduate and graduate students that has provided a snapshot every four years of the state of how students pay for higher education. (Going forward, there will be a new dataset produced every two years, which is great news!) The 2015-16 NPSAS dropped on Tuesday morning, which sent nerds everywhere running to their computers to run numbers via PowerStats.

In this post, I look at graduate student borrowing, which is of increasing interest to policymakers given the average size of graduate student loan burdens and the potential implications for taxpayers thanks to income-driven repayment and Public Service Loan Forgiveness. I used the TrendStats tool to look at graduate student loan debt by race/ethnicity every four years from 2000 to 2016, based on concerns raised by Judith Scott-Clayton about the growth in student debt among African-American students.

The first figure looks at overall trends in graduate student borrowing across each of the five cohorts. The percentage with no debt fell from 51% in 2000 to 39% in 2008 before remaining steady throughout the rest of the period. Meanwhile, the percentage with at least $50,000 in debt (for both undergraduate and graduate school) went up from 9% in 2000 to 32% in 2016, with a steady upward trend across every cohort. The increases were even larger among those with more than $100,000 in debt, with that share going from 1.5% to 14.2% during this period. (The introduction of Grad PLUS loans in 2006 probably didn’t hurt that trend, although the jump between 2008 and 2012 was larger than the jump between 2004 and 2008.)

I broke down the borrowing data by race/ethnicity to look at the percentage of graduate students with no debt at all across each cohort. Across each cohort, at least 60% of Asian students had no debt, while the percentage of white students with no debt was 51% in 2000 before meandering around 40% in more recent cohorts. Forty-five percent of Hispanic students had no debt in 2000, which steadily fell to 27% in 2016. Among African-American students, however, the percentage with no debt fell from 37% in 2000 to 17% in both 2012 and 2016. Part of this may be due to the higher likelihood of black students to study in fields with fewer graduate assistantships (such as education), but family resources likely play a crucial role here.

Finally, I examined the percentage of students with at least $100,000 in educational debt by race and ethnicity. All groups of students started out at between one and two percent with six-figure debts in 2000, but those rates quickly diverged. By 2012, 7% of Asian students, 11% of white students, 14% of Hispanic students, and 21% of black students had at least $100,000 in educational debt. In the newest NPSAS wave, all racial/ethnic groups except black students stayed within one percentage point of their 2012 level. But in 2016, an astonishing 30% of African-American graduate students had at least $100,000 in debt—nearly three times the rate of white students.

In future posts, I will look at some other interesting tidbits from the new NPSAS data. But for right now, these graphics are so depressing that I need to step away and work on something else. Student loan debt isn’t a crisis for all students, but it’s an increasingly urgent matter for African-American students in particular as well as for taxpayers who will be expected to pay for at least partial loan forgiveness.

[Check out my next post for some regressions that explore the extent to which the black/white gap in the percentage of grad students with $100,000 in debt can be explained by other factors.]

Examining Long-Term Student Loan Default Rates by Race and Ethnicity

Since the release of long-term student loan default data in the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study last fall, one finding that has gotten a great deal of attention is the large gap in default rates by race and ethnicity. Judith Scott-Clayton of Teachers College, Ben Miller of the Center for American Progress, and I all highlighted the high percentage of African-American students who began college in the 2003-04 academic year and defaulted on their loans by 2015. As the chart below shows, black students were more than twice as likely to default on their loans than white students (49% versus 20%), with some differences by institutional type.

But since some of the difference in default rates could be due to other factors (such as family resources and the type of college attended), I ran logistic regressions using the handy regression tools in PowerStats. The first regression just controls for race/ethnicity, while the second regression adds in other control variables of interest. The results are presented as odds ratios, meaning that coefficients larger than 1 reflect a higher likelihood of default and coefficients smaller than 1 reflect a lower likelihood. (Here’s a good primer on interpreting odds ratios.)

In the first regression, the odds ratios for black (3.69), Hispanic (2.09), multiracial (2.56), and American Indian/Alaska Native students (2.45) were all significantly higher than white students at p<.05, while Asian students (0.48) had significantly lower default rates.

Results of logistic regression predicting student loan default rates by 2015 (with controls).
Variable Odds Ratio Lower 95% Upper 95% p-value
Race/ethnicity (reference group: white)
  Black or African American 3.6890 3.0490 4.4620 <0.01
  Hispanic or Latino 2.0870 1.5770 2.7600 <0.01
  Asian 0.4750 0.3170 0.7120 <0.01
  American Indian or Alaska Native 2.4540 1.1220 5.3680 0.03
  Native Hawaiian / other Pacific Islander 0.7170 0.1640 3.1330 0.66
  Other 1.2200 0.7610 1.9560 0.41
  More than one race 2.5640 1.6800 3.9140 <0.01
Source: Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study.

After adding in control variables, the coefficients for underrepresented minority students were somewhat smaller. But for African-American (2.56) and multiracial (2.45) students, they were still significantly higher than for white students after adding other controls. This means that black students were about 150% more likely to default than white students—an enormous gap after taking a number of other important factors into account. The coefficients for Hispanic and American Indian students were no longer significant, and Asian students were still less likely to default than white students (an odds ratio of 0.42).

Variable Odds Ratio Lower 95% Upper 95% p-value
Race/ethnicity (reference group: white)
  Black or African American 2.5587 2.0370 3.2139 <0.01
  Hispanic or Latino 1.2606 0.9526 1.6683 0.10
  Asian 0.4249 0.2629 0.6869 <0.01
  American Indian or Alaska Native 1.7371 0.7307 4.1299 0.21
  Native Hawaiian / other Pacific Islander 0.3473 0.0473 2.5505 0.30
  Other 0.8835 0.4458 1.7509 0.72
  More than one race 2.4492 1.5499 3.8704 <0.01
Parents’ highest level of education (reference group: high school grad)
  Did not complete high school 0.7242 0.5085 1.0315 0.07
  Some college or associate degree 0.7883 0.6404 0.9702 0.02
  Bachelor’s degree 0.6181 0.4821 0.7923 <0.01
  Graduate/professional degree 0.5502 0.4242 0.7135 <0.01
Income as percent of poverty level 2003-04 0.9981 0.9976 0.9987 <0.01
Dependency status 2003-04 (reference group: dependent)
  Independent 1.4552 1.0738 1.9719 0.02
Gender (reference group: female)
  Male 1.3553 1.1491 1.5984 <0.01
Age first year enrolled 0.9893 0.9709 1.0081 0.26
First institution sector 2003-04 (reference group: community colleges)
  Public 4-year 0.7858 0.6403 0.9644 0.02
  Private nonprofit 4-year 0.7756 0.6025 0.9985 0.05
  Private nonprofit 2-year or less 1.4838 0.6498 3.3880 0.35
  For-profit 2.1968 1.7624 2.7384 <0.01
Source: Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study.

Additionally, the regression also shows the importance of parental education, family income, and sector of attendance in predicting the likelihood of long-term default. Notably, students who began at a for-profit college were about 120% more likely to default on their loans than community college students, while four-year students were less likely. Men were 36% more likely to default on their loans than women, an interesting finding given men typically earn more money than women.

Much more needs to be done to dig deeper into factors associated with long-term student loan default rates. But at this point, it appears clear that other demographic and institutional characteristics available in the BPS do relatively little to explain the large gaps in default rates between black and white students. It would be helpful to have measures of family wealth available given large black-white differences in wealth to see how much of the variation in default rates is due to family resources.

Examining Average Student Loan Balances by State

In a blog post last month, I used newly-available data from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Federal Student Aid to look at the amount of student loan dollars in income-driven repayment plans by amount of debt. In that post, I showed that students with more debt were far more likely to use IDR than students with less debt, with students having over $60,000 in debt being about twice as likely to use IDR as those with between $20,000 and $40,000 in debt.

In this post, I want to highlight some other new data that provides interesting insights into the federal student aid portfolio. I looked at state-level data (based on current residence, not where they went to college) that shows outstanding balances and the number of borrowers for both all Direct Loans (the vast majority of federal student loans at this point) and for those enrolled in income-driven plans. I then estimated the average loan value by dividing the two. The data are summarized in the table below.

 All Direct Loans  Loans in IDR plans
State  Balance ($bil) Borrowers (1000s)  Avg loan  Balance ($bil) Borrowers (1000s)  Avg loan
AL 15.9 522.2        30,400 5.4 100.0        54,000
AK 1.7 59.9        28,400 0.6 10.3        58,300
AZ 21.2 711.9        29,800 7.7 137.1        56,200
AR 8.5 312.9        27,200 3.0 62.0        48,400
CA 102.8 3307.3        31,100 36.7 600.2        61,100
CO 20.4 662.1        30,800 7.7 133.6        57,600
CT 12.1 414.6        29,200 3.4 59.6        57,000
DE 3.1 101.2        30,600 1.0 17.4        57,500
DC 5.0 102.2        48,900 2.4 25.7        93,400
FL 65.7 2063.1        31,800 26.4 473.1        55,800
GA 45.8 1350.2        33,900 16.6 279.2        59,500
HI 3.1 104.5        29,700 1.1 18.2        60,400
ID 5.3 191.7        27,600 2.1 41.6        50,500
IL 45.7 1439.7        31,700 14.9 247.9        60,100
IN 21.6 794.7        27,200 7.3 152.3        47,900
IA 10.4 405.8        25,600 3.3 67.8        48,700
KS 9.2 339.5        27,100 2.9 57.6        50,300
KY 13.8 507.1        27,200 4.9 102.6        47,800
LA 14.1 499.1        28,300 4.9 95.2        51,500
ME 4.4 158.8        27,700 1.5 30.0        50,000
MD 25.1 707.2        35,500 8.3 123.5        67,200
MA 23.1 783.7        29,500 7.0 114.3        61,200
MI 37.9 1262.4        30,000 13.2 243.4        54,200
MN 19.9 709.9        28,000 6.7 124.4        53,900
MS 10.6 360.7        29,400 3.8 75.2        50,500
MO 21.0 707.2        29,700 7.6 143.5        53,000
MT 3.0 106.5        28,200 1.2 23.1        51,900
NE 5.7 216.9        26,300 1.9 37.8        50,300
NV 7.5 262.9        28,500 2.8 51.6        54,300
NH 4.7 165.2        28,500 1.4 26.2        53,400
NJ 29.7 999.5        29,700 8.4 145.1        57,900
NM 5.3 189.3        28,000 2.1 39.7        52,900
NY 67.9 2113.1        32,100 24.0 387.8        61,900
NC 32.7 1065.5        30,700 11.8 213.6        55,200
ND 1.8 75.1        24,000 0.6 12.0        50,000
OH 45.4 1577.1        28,800 16.0 313.8        51,000
OK 10.3 383.0        26,900 3.6 71.5        50,300
OR 14.9 475.8        31,300 6.1 107.7        56,600
PA 46.1 1539.3        29,900 15.1 275.3        54,800
RI 3.3 119.6        27,600 1.0 18.8        53,200
SC 18.2 584.7        31,100 6.8 123.5        55,100
SD 2.6 98.9        26,300 0.9 17.9        50,300
TN 21.3 700.7        30,400 7.8 146.0        53,400
TX 76.5 2772.1        27,600 26.1 516.4        50,500
UT 6.9 256.8        26,900 2.7 47.3        57,100
VT 2.1 66.4        31,600 0.8 13.1        61,100
VA 29.9 913.8        32,700 10.1 166.0        60,800
WA 20.1 674.8        29,800 7.4 128.0        57,800
WV 5.4 200.3        27,000 1.8 37.0        48,600
WI 17.0 646.6        26,300 5.7 114.5        49,800
WY 1.2 45.3        26,500 0.4 8.0        50,000

Nationwide, the average outstanding Direct Loan balance was right at $30,000, with significant variation across states (ranging from $24,000 in North Dakota to $48,900 in Washington, DC). The average outstanding balance in IDR was $55,800, which suggests that many borrowers in IDR attended graduate school in order to accumulate that amount of debt. State-level average IDR balances ranged from $47,800 in Kentucky to an impressive $93,400 in Washington, DC. California, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, Vermont, and Virginia all had average balances over $60,000—and they are all high cost of living states with high percentages of adults obtaining graduate or professional degrees.

Once again, kudos to the Department of Education for slowly releasing more data on the federal student loan portfolio. But there are still quite a few important data points (such as school-level data or anything on PLUS loans) that still aren’t available to the public.

Who Uses Income-Driven Repayment Plans?

Over the last two years, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Federal Student Aid has quietly released additional data on the federal government’s portfolio of nearly $1.4 trillion in student loans. I was on the FSA website today looking up the most recent data on Public Service Loan Forgiveness employment certification forms (up to 740,000 filed as of September 30) for a paper I am currently drafting when a new set of spreadsheets on the income-driven repayment (IDR) programs caught my eye.

Overall, just over $375 billion of the $1.05 trillion in federal Direct Loans is now enrolled across the various types of IDR programs. (The rest of the federal loan portfolio is in the old FFEL program, which does not make new loans.) This is up from $269 billion of loans in IDRs when I last wrote about the topic on my blog in mid-2016, which has implications for both students and taxpayers alike. Here, I summarize some of the new data on the types of borrowers who use IDR, as well as some of the other data elements that would be helpful to have going forward.

It is not surprising that students with more debt are more interested in income-driven repayment plans, as many borrowers with less debt could manage payments under the standard ten-year repayment plan. But I was surprised by how much of the debt is held by a small percentage of borrowers. About 1.9 million of the 35.3 million borrowers (or five percent) have more than $100,000 in debt—and this is primarily due to graduate school attendance (since undergraduates cannot borrow more than $57,500 without resorting to PLUS loans). Yet these borrowers hold $325 billion in Direct Loans, or about 30% of all loans outstanding. About $173 billion of this amount is enrolled in IDR plans—53% of all debt held by those with six-figure debts. On the other hand, less than one-fourth of all debt of borrowers with less than $40,000 outstanding is enrolled in IDR. The table and figure below show the amount of Direct Loans outstanding and the amount enrolled in IDR by debt burden.

(UPDATE 2/1/18: As a commenter noted below, there is a small percentage of loans from the old FFEL program in income-driven repayment plans. But as far as I can tell from the data, this only slightly overstates the percentage of Direct Loans in IDR. I’m confident that the general trends still hold, though.)

Table 1: Direct Loan and IDR volumes by debt burden.
Amount of debt All Direct Loans ($bil) IDR ($bil) Pct of loans in IDR
Less than $5k 16.9 0.9 5.3%
$5k-$10k 45.6 4.0 8.8%
$10k-$20k 110.7 16.7 15.1%
$20k-$40k 220.6 52.9 24.0%
$40k-$60k 154.6 50.9 32.9%
$60k-$80k 110.5 48.2 43.6%
$80k-$100k 71.3 30.3 42.5%
$100k-$200k 191.7 90.5 47.2%
More than $200k 133.5 82.3 61.6%
Total 1055.4 376.7 35.7%

I also examined new FSA data on Direct Loan and IDR volumes by age (Table 2 below) and institution type (Table 3). The data show that younger borrowers (between ages 25 and 49) have a higher percentage of dollars in IDR than older borrowers and that students who attended private nonprofit and for-profit colleges rely on IDR more heavily than students who went to public colleges. The finding by sector matches general patterns in tuition and fees, but it does not suggest that for-profit college students disproportionately turn to IDR to manage their loan burdens.

Table 2: Direct Loan and IDR volumes by age of borrower.
Age All Direct Loans ($bil) IDR ($bil) Pct of loans in IDR
24 or younger 128 9.2 7.2%
25-34 418.3 177.4 42.4%
35-49 337.9 139.8 41.4%
50-61 140.5 39 27.8%
62 or older 30.6 11.3 36.9%
Total 1055.3 376.7 35.7%

 

Table 3: Direct Loan and IDR volumes by institutional type.
Sector All Direct Loans ($bil) IDR ($bil) Pct of loans in IDR
Public 464.2 143.3 30.9%
Private nonprofit 337 126.5 37.5%
For-profit 176.6 63.6 36.0%
Total 977.8 333.4 34.1%

There are two additional data elements that would be extremely useful in considering the implications of income-driven repayment plans. Ideally, data on IDR takeup would be available at the institutional level (as I have politely requested in the past). But at the very least, a breakdown by undergraduate/graduate student status would be useful information.

And one final request of any journalists or qualitative researchers who may be reading this blog—I would love to know more about how the PSLF approval process is going now that some borrowers have made the 120 monthly payments necessary to qualify for forgiveness. It’s been strange not to hear anything about that process after applications could be submitted as early as October 2017.