How Financial Responsibility Scores Do Not Affect Institutional Behaviors

One of the federal government’s longstanding accountability efforts in higher education is the financial responsibility score—a metric designed to reflect a private college’s financial stability. The federal government has an interest in making sure that only stable colleges receive federal funds, as taxpayers often end up footing at least part of the bill when colleges shut down and students may struggle to resume their education elsewhere. The financial responsibility score metric ranges from -1.0 to 3.0, with colleges scoring between 1.0 and 1.4 being placed under additional oversight and those scoring below 1.0 being required to post a letter of credit with the Department of Education.

Although these scores have been released to the public since the 2006-07 academic year and there was a great deal of dissatisfaction among private colleges regarding how the scores were calculated, there had been no prior academic research on the topic before I started my work in the spring of 2014. My question was simple: did receiving a poor financial responsibility score induce colleges to shift their financial priorities (either increasing revenues or decreasing expenditures) in an effort to avoid future sanctions?

But as is often the case in academic research, the road to a published article was far from smooth and direct. Getting rejected by two different journals took nearly two years and then it took another two years for this paper to wind its way through the review, page proof, and publication process at the Journal of Education Finance. (In the meantime, I scratched my itch on the topic and put a stake in the ground by writing a few blog posts highlighting the data and teasing my findings.)

More than four and a half years after starting work on this project, I am thrilled to share that my paper, “Do Financial Responsibility Scores Affect Institutional Behaviors?” is a part of the most recent issue of the Journal of Education Finance. I examined financial responsibility score data from 2006-07 to 2013-14 in this paper, although I tried to get data going farther back since these scores have been calculated since at least 1996. I filed a Freedom of Information Act request back in 2014 for the data, and my appeal was denied in 2017 on the grounds that the request to receive data (that already existed in some format!) was “too burdensome and expensive.” At that point, the paper was already accepted at JEF, but I am obviously still a little annoyed with how that process went.

Anyway, I failed to find any clear evidence that private nonprofit or for-profit colleges changed their fiscal priorities after receiving an unfavorable financial responsibility score. To some extent, this result made sense among private nonprofit colleges; colleges tend to move fairly slowly and many of their costs are sticky (such as facilities and tenured faculty). But for-profit colleges, which generally tend to be fairly agile critters, the null findings were more surprising. There is certainly more work to do in this area (particularly given the changes in higher education that have occurred over the last five years), so I encourage more researchers to delve into this topic.

To aspiring researchers and those who rely on research in their jobs—I hope this blog post provides some insights into the scholarly publication process and all of the factors that can slow down the production of research. I started this paper during my first year on faculty and it finally came out during my tenure review year (which is okay because accepted papers still count even if they are not yet in print). Many papers move more quickly than this one, but it is worth highlighting that research is a pursuit for people with a fair amount of patience.

Author: Robert

I am an assistant professor of higher education at Seton Hall University. All opinions are my own.

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